Summer events and temporary event notices

Posted: Monday, 6 June 2016 @ 10:54
Summer events and temporary event notices

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Now that summer is truly with us it is worth looking how you can maximise your profit by taking advantage of what looks like being a summer of music sport and fun.

We start off with the Queen's 90th birthday celebrations on Saturday 11th June, which handily coincides with the start of the Euro 2016 football. But everywhere there are music festivals and events which will be televised. If you have the legal rights to broadcast these events you may have a willing audience to attract to your premises. Or you may wish to organise a pop-up event yourself. But first of all you need to identify what licences you will need. You may already have a premises licence, or club premises certificate, but does it cover all that you need? Does it cover all the activities? Does it give you the required hours? And are there any other conditions which may need amending to allow the event as you have planned? If not you need to give a temporary event notice as soon as possible.

If you do not have a premises licence or club premises certificate you can use the temporary event notice to allow licensable activities, which are the sale of alcohol, regulated entertainment, and late night refreshment.

For the Queen's 90th birthday on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th June, and any events which coincide, you probably do not have to do anything, as the government have already extended the hours for the sale of alcohol (for consumption on the premises only). Essentially what you have at 11pm will be extended from 11pm to 1am. So for example If you can sell alcohol until 11pm you can do so until 1am. And if your premises licence provides for regulated entertainment until 11pm, it will also be extended until 1am. And if you sell alcohol the sale of hot food will also be permitted during those extended hours.

But watch out if you have a beer garden or other area not included within the area of the licence. Such areas are treated as off sales areas, and the automatic extensions will not apply to those areas. Also note that other conditions on the licence will still apply, such as time for closing outside areas and door staff provisions.

Remember, if you need to give a temporary event notice you must move quickly as you have to serve it at least 10 clear working days before the event. There is a short notice procedure, which requires 5 working days, but there are limitations.

For full details on the temporary event notice procedure click here.

 

Blog by Nigel Musgrove
Nigel has been providing dispute resolution advice as a solicitor for over 35 years. As well as advising SMEs and business owners on disputes he also offers a specialist licensing law service. View profile
Call Nigel on +44 (0)1285 847 001 or by email
This blog is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor is it intended to be a complete and authoritative statement of the law, and what we say might be out of date by the time you read it. You should always seek legal advice to confirm whether or how any information in this article applies to your particular situation. We offer a free telephone consultation to discuss your particular circumstances.

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Thank you. Your response is great, very straight to the point! Hopefully this will bring an end to the matter. I will certainly be recommending your services as I am very impressed with the prompt dealing of this matter.
Janet Burbidge

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