Gaming machine prizes on licensed premises

Posted: Thursday, 21 May 2009 @ 21:20

Will punters be amused by the prizes? In June the maximum stakes and prizes for Category C Amusement with Prizes (AWP) machines in pubs is set to double. Maximum stakes will be £1, and the maximum prize will go up to £70. But this news comes with a sting in the tail, as machine tax is rising from £760 to £830 per year.

Landlords of licensed premises may see little benefit in direct terms, but hope it will keep existing customers interested, and with luck attract new ones.


Don’t forget a few of the legalities. In a pub you can have up to 2 machines in Categories C and D with minimum red tape with permits.


Category C machines are those which from June will have a maximum stake of £1 and maximum cash prize of £70.


Category D machines limits will depend on the type of machine. Non-cash machines such as crane grabs will have maximum stakes of £1 and maximum non-cash prize value of £50. Cash payout machines will retain their current maximum stake of 10p, and maximum prize value will increase .to £15 (of which £8 can be a money prize).


For up to 2 machines in categories C or D you simply give notice to the licensing authority that you have the machines and pay a £50 once and for all fee. You can only operate more than 2 machines if you have a permit issued by the licensing authority, and this permit has to be renewed, and any new operator must apply for a transfer to them and pay a fee of £25.


Remember that Category C machines are limited to play by those 18 or over, and notices to this effect have to be displayed by the machine, and the machines have to be supervised to ensure compliance. Children can play on Category D machines.


Nigel Musgrove
Licensing Law Specialist
» Categories: Licensing

Blog by Nigel Musgrove
Nigel has been providing dispute resolution advice as a solicitor for over 35 years. As well as advising SMEs and business owners on disputes he also offers a specialist licensing law service. View profile
Call Nigel on +44 (0)1285 847 001 or by email
This blog is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor is it intended to be a complete and authoritative statement of the law, and what we say might be out of date by the time you read it. You should always seek legal advice to confirm whether or how any information in this article applies to your particular situation. We offer a free telephone consultation to discuss your particular circumstances.

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