Alcohol and Designated Public Places Orders

Posted: Wednesday, 20 April 2011 @ 15:25
Alcohol and Designated Public Places Orders

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Last week I blogged about consuming alcohol in pub gardens and similar areas. But how does a Designated Public Places Order (DPPO) affect such areas?

Many local authorities have made DPPOs to combat the problems that can be caused by drinking alcohol in public. The DPPO will set out the specific geographic area it applies to. But what does a DPPO do?

It is a common mistake to think that a DPPO amounts to a total ban on drinking alcohol in public places. It is not. The drinking of alcohol is permissible. It only becomes an offence if someone in a public place within the DPPO continues to drink alcohol when asked to stop by a police officer or other authorised officer, or fails to hand over to them on request any alcohol they have in their possession, whether opened or not.

However, the premises themselves and their grounds, which are licensed by a Premises Licence to sell alcohol or subject to a Temporary Event Notice authorising the sale of alcohol, are a special case as far as the DPPO is concerned. Although they come within the definition of public place contained in the relevant Act, they are exempt  i.e not a public place, at times when they are  being used for the sale or supply of alcohol, and at times within 30 minutes after the end of time permitted for sale.

But note that at other times the premises themselves be it pub, hotel, restaurant, bar, night club (but not a private members' club), are public places and the powers apply.  

Nigel Musgrove

Licensing Law Specialist

Tel: 0845 003 5639

Blog by Nigel Musgrove
Nigel has been providing dispute resolution advice as a solicitor for over 35 years. As well as advising SMEs and business owners on disputes he also offers a specialist licensing law service. View profile
Call Nigel on +44 (0)1285 847 001 or by email
This blog is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor is it intended to be a complete and authoritative statement of the law, and what we say might be out of date by the time you read it. You should always seek legal advice to confirm whether or how any information in this article applies to your particular situation. We offer a free telephone consultation to discuss your particular circumstances.

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Thank you. Your response is great, very straight to the point! Hopefully this will bring an end to the matter. I will certainly be recommending your services as I am very impressed with the prompt dealing of this matter.
Janet Burbidge

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