Military ID to buy a pint

Posted: Monday, 19 July 2010 @ 15:36
Military ID to buy a pint

Speak to a lawyer

It seems strange that Military ID may not be accepted as poof of age when buying alcohol. You may think that Military ID is the most secure form of ID. But for a long time the acceptable forms of ID have been a Passport, European Driving Licence (with photo), and a PASS accredited card.

All the training and literature and signage has been geared to these forms of ID. And many Premises Licences will have conditions endorsed on them insisting on specific accepatble forms of ID, and Military ID is seldom among them, if at all. So the Challenge 21 schemes and the like will not help our young soldiers who are fit to fight and die for our country but cannot use their Military ID to buy a pint. It's a strange world!

But change may be afoot. Perhaps the sacrifices of our young lads (and lasses) is striking a chord of common sense. The British Beer and Pub Association is backing the use of Military ID as an acceptable form of ID for licensed premises. The issue will probably only occur near barracks, but perhaps there should be a recognition everywhere that Militray ID is ok. At the end of the day it is a matter for the management of premises which ID they will accept (subject to any licence conditions), but perhaps it will not be too much of a burden to include Militay ID in training so it can be accepted by bar staff and off licence staff.

It always bemuses me that in this country we can marry at 16 and raise a family and at 17 can go to war and die for our country, but until you are 18 you cannot buy alcohol. As I said it is a strange world.

Nigel Musgrove

Licensing Law Specialist

Blog by Nigel Musgrove
Nigel has been providing dispute resolution advice as a solicitor for over 35 years. As well as advising SMEs and business owners on disputes he also offers a specialist licensing law service. View profile
Call Nigel on +44 (0)1285 847 001 or by email
This blog is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor is it intended to be a complete and authoritative statement of the law, and what we say might be out of date by the time you read it. You should always seek legal advice to confirm whether or how any information in this article applies to your particular situation. We offer a free telephone consultation to discuss your particular circumstances.

Comments

  • There are no comments for this page - click here to be the first

Need legal advice for your business? We can help

Directors

Directors
Practical advice and legal support for company owners and directors.

Disputes

Disputes
In dispute with a customer or supplier? Get practical advice and support.

Your legal advisor

Your legal advisor
Board level legal advice without the costs of an in-house lawyer.

Speak to a lawyer

Speak to a lawyer
Cousins Business Law excels at demystifying potentially complex legal areas for small business owners
Simon Moore, MD Moore News Ltd

Get legal updates

Enter your email address to receive our monthly Blog Newsletter


We will keep your email safe in accordance with our privacy policy.

Get the FREE definitive guide to solving business disputes

Speak to a lawyer

Get legal updates

Enter your email address to receive our monthly Blog Newsletter
The Law Society
Top